Friday, 25 April 2014 Login
Joomla Templates and Joomla Extensions by JoomlaVision.Com
Agriculture - Agriculture: Hope for African livestock keepers as scientists decode Tsetse fly genome - Friday, 25 April 2014 06:23
Technology - Technology: Science & Technology in Africa: World Bank to Finance 19 Centers of Excellence - Thursday, 24 April 2014 09:38
Technology - Technology: Internet bridging the gender gap - Thursday, 24 April 2014 09:27
Health - Health: New Tuberculosis Drug Regimen Moves to Phase 3 Clinical Trial - Thursday, 24 April 2014 07:57
Health - Health: Kenya: New gadget to screen cervical cancer launched - Wednesday, 23 April 2014 12:57
Technology - Technology: ICT pushing Nigerian economy high - Wednesday, 23 April 2014 11:52
Health - Health: Swaziland to ‘cut’ 4 000 school boys - Wednesday, 23 April 2014 11:29
Health - Health: Merck Pharma to Pilots a Diabetes SMS Campaign in Kenya, Uganda - Tuesday, 22 April 2014 11:29

Choose your language

ASNS Tweets

time2online Extensions: Simple Video Flash Player Module

News Search

Login Form

Login

Headline News

Joomla Templates and Joomla Extensions by JoomlaVision.Com

Hope for African livestock keepers as scientists decode Tsetse fly genome

The war against trypanosomiasis and sleeping sickness in Africa has gone a notch higher with the breakthrough by scientists to crack the genetic code of tsetse fly--- the vectors for the single-cell parasites. Found only in Africa, trypanosomiasis, or nagana,…

Detail

Science & Technology in Africa: World Bank to Finance 19 Centers of Excellence

The World Bank’s Board of Executive Directors has approved US$150 million to finance 19 university-based Centers of Excellence in seven countries in West and Central Africa. These competitively selected centers will receive funding for advanced specialized studies in science, technology,…

Detail

Internet bridging the gender gap

Integration of the internet in the information, communication technology has bridged the digital divide among gender the DotConnectAfrica (DCA) Executive Director Sophia Bekele said at the annual Girl's ICT day in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia organized by International Telecommunication Union (ITU).

Detail

New Tuberculosis Drug Regimen Moves to Phase 3 Clinical Trial

Based on positive results from earlier clinical studies, TB Alliance is advancing the first-ever drug regimen designed to treat both drug-sensitive and some forms of multi-drug resistant tuberculosis (TB) to a global Phase 3 clinical trial.  

Detail

Kenya: New gadget to screen cervical cancer launched

Kenya’s ministry of health will spend KSh3.4 billion in the next 10 years to equip public health facilities with modern equipment to help fight rising cancer cases, Patrick Amoth, head of division of health said Wednesday in Nairobi.

Detail

Devolved drug acquisition, distribution to distort Kenya’s war against malaria

Kenya’s efforts to fight off high burden of diseases could suffer a set back if plans by the Senate to allow each of the 47 Counties to import and distribute drugs outside the national supply’s agency. The Counties are a…

Detail

ICT pushing Nigerian economy high

Information and Communications Technology, ICT added N6.97 trillion addition to the Nigerian economy in 2013, the Statistician-General Dr. Yemi Kale said recently. Nigerian economy is estimated at N80.22 trillion (USD 1billion).

Detail

Swaziland to ‘cut’ 4 000 school boys

Over 4000 Swazi high school boys registered for voluntary medical male circumcision this April in a bid to reduce risks of catching HIV, thanks to massive campaigns by the country’s health sector players.

Detail


Hope for African livestock keepers as scientists decode Tsetse fly genome

PDF | Print | E-mail

Written by Kevin Wafula Friday, 25 April 2014 06:23

The war against trypanosomiasis and sleeping sickness in Africa has gone a notch higher with the breakthrough by scientists to crack the genetic code of tsetse fly--- the vectors for the single-cell parasites.

Found only in Africa, trypanosomiasis, or nagana, an often-lethal disease that affects some 3 million animals in the region each year at massive costs to farmers’ livelihoods and food security.

The disease leads to a debilitating chronic condition that reduces fertility, weight gain, meat and milk production, and makes livestock too weak to be used for ploughing or transport, which in turn affects crop production.

Humans bitten by carrier flies can develop African sleeping sickness, which can be fatal without treatment.

No vaccine against the disease exists for livestock or humans because the parasite is able to evade mammalian immune systems, so control methods primarily involve targeting tsetse flies through trapping, pesticide treatments and sterile male release strategies.

“Decoding the tsetse fly’s DNA is a major scientific breakthrough that opens the way for more effective control of trypanosomiasis, which is good news for millions of herders and farmers in sub-Saharan Africa,” said Kostas Bourtzis of the Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture.

The tsetse genome was sequenced and annotated during a 10-year international collaborative effort that involved the Insect Pest Control Laboratory run jointly by the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in Vienna. The achievement allows scientists to better study the fly’s genes and their functions, knowledge that should open the door for researching ways to control the insect.

“Detection and treatment of trypanosomiasis is currently expensive, difficult and dangerous for the livestock as it often involves toxic drugs, but this new knowledge will accelerate research on tsetse control methods and help scientists develop new and complementary strategies to reduce the use of costly drugs and insecticides,” added Bourtzis.

In their contribution to decoding the genome, scientists from the FAO/IAEA Insect Pest Control Laboratory focused on the tsetse fly’s relationship with a symbiotic bacterium, Wolbachia, which in many insect species affects its host’s biology and physiology, including reproduction, mating behaviour and capacity as a vector.

“Our group was involved in the discovery of the horizontal transfer of large stretches of genomic sequence from the Wolbachia bacteria into the tsetse genome,” Bourtzis said. “How these gene insertions affect the biology of the tsetse is currently being investigated.”

The tsetse fly’s complex relationship with Wolbachia and two other symbiotic bacteria are part of its unique biology, which also involves feeding exclusively on vertebrate blood, giving birth to live young, and feeding young by lactation.

A first set of findings on the tsetse fly genome will be published in the journal Science on Friday in a paper entitled ‘Genome Sequence of the Tsetse Fly (Glossina morsitans): Vector of African Trypanosomiasis’.

The Joint FAO/IAEA Division is currently supporting 14 African nations in their efforts to tackle the trypanosomiasis problem by controlling tsetse fly populations by integrating the sterile insect technique with other control methods.

A form of insect birth control, the sterile insect technique involves releasing mass-bred male flies that have been sterilized by low doses of radiation into infested areas, where they mate with wild females. These do not produce offspring and, as a result, the technique can suppress and, if applied systematically on an area-wide basis, eventually eradicate populations of wild flies.

Tsetse flies were successfully eradicated from the island of Zanzibar using the sterile insect technique and are currently being suppressed in parts of southern Ethiopia. In January, Senegal reported that it was making significant progress in infested areas in the Niayes with the same method.

Established in 1964, the Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture uses the talents and resources of both organizations to broaden cooperation among their member countries in applying nuclear technology and related biotechnologies to improve sustainable food security.

1 Vote

0 Comments

 

Science & Technology in Africa: World Bank to Finance 19 Centers of Excellence

PDF | Print | E-mail

Written by Adeleke Mainasara Thursday, 24 April 2014 09:38

The World Bank’s Board of Executive Directors has approved US$150 million to finance 19 university-based Centers of Excellence in seven countries in West and Central Africa. These competitively selected centers will receive funding for advanced specialized studies in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM)-related disciplines, as well as in agriculture and health.

Read more...

6 Votes

0 Comments

 

Internet bridging the gender gap

PDF | Print | E-mail

Written by Tadesse E. Thursday, 24 April 2014 09:27

Integration of the internet in the information, communication technology has bridged the digital divide among gender the DotConnectAfrica (DCA) Executive Director Sophia Bekele said at the annual Girl's ICT day in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia organized by International Telecommunication Union (ITU).

Read more...

4 Votes

0 Comments

 
  • «
  •  Start 
  •  Prev 
  •  1 
  •  2 
  •  3 
  •  4 
  •  5 
  •  6 
  •  7 
  •  8 
  •  9 
  •  10 
  •  Next 
  •  End 
  • »

Page 1 of 284

Joomla Templates and Joomla Extensions by JoomlaVision.Com
Joomla Templates and Joomla Extensions by JoomlaVision.Com
bitkiler ve zombiler oyna | counter strike 1.6 oyna | counter strike oyna | dünyanın en zor oyunu oyna | fifa 2014 oyna | kelima avı oyna | lipton akıllı çay bardağı oyna | max steel oyna | maymunu mutlu et oyna | otobüs park etme oyna | pes 2014 oyna | asphalt 8 oyna | gta san andreas oyna | bizim çiftlik oyna | erkek saç modelleri | barbie giydirme oyunları | boy uzatma not defteri dizisi medcezir nerede çekiliyor Ben 10 Omniverse Oyna kara para aşk izle regular show oyna ölümüne sür oyna